Lakes of Washington State  listed by County

Our thanks and hats off to Mike Jennings of Yakima WA who has submitted most of the original information for this page. If you can help and have any information you would like added to this page and e-mail it to us now. We will add anything you send about anybody of water listed below including:

  • Scenery photos of the location

  • Photos of fish caught at the location

  • Local contact: give us your name and e-mail address if you want to be listed as a local contact for a particular location(s) and we will add it below the lake or river. Then people will be able to e-mail you and ask about current conditions or for tips or info on what to use to catch fish there.

  • Maps or location info.

  • Resort or Camping information or any other information about facilities in the nearby area. 

Bodies of water are listed by the county they are in. 

Click on the letter of the county you want to inquire . 

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ADAMS COUNTY
  • Black Lakes: Two lakes upper 19.5 acres /  lower 6acres. Both contain species: spiny ray. location: 8 miles NW of Othello. Hike in 1/10 mile to the lakes.
  • Bobcat Lake
  • Bobcat Creek Ponds: species: bluegill largemouth bass.
  • Butte Lakes
  • Campbell Lake
  • Cow Lake
  • Crane Lake
  • Deadman Lake
  • Finnel Lake
  • Fourth of July Lake (110 acres): location: 2 miles south of Sprague straddles the Adams/Lincoln County line, with 74 acres in Adams County and 36 acres in Lincoln. The special winter season runs December 1 through March 31, and produces nice rainbow trout. Check the regulations pamphlet for size restrictions. There is an access area with a boat launch, but internal combustion engines are not allowed.
  • Hallin Lake
  • Linda Lake
  • McMannaman Lake
  • Pines Lake
  • Quail Lake location: next to Herman lake, Quail is a 12 acre walk in lake, part of the Seep Lakes chain. Has rainbow trout. A one mile walk in, part of the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge.
  • Royal Lake
  • Sprague Lake (1900+ acres) 

    Local Info

    Sprague Lake Campground  509-257-2864

    Four Seasons Campground and Resort  509-257-2332


  • Thread Lake

ASOTIN COUNTY

  • Headgate Pond: This impoundment off Asotin Creek is open only to juveniles and free license holders, from the last Saturday in April through October 31. 
  • Silcott Pond
  • Evans Pond, Golf Course Pond, Silcott Pond: These small impoundments off the Snake River near the bottom of Alpowa Grade normally get fished early and hard. All have public access.

BENTON COUNTY

  • Columbia Park Lagoon: (9 acres) location: near the Kennewick end of the Highway 395 bridge, near the Columbia Park boat ramp. It opened in April of 1998 as the state's first family fishing water, open to juveniles and licensed adults accompanied by a juvenile. This concept is intended to encourage teaching, mentoring and family activities. The lake is stocked annually with rainbow trout, and has been stocked with smallmouth and largemouth bass, crappie, bluegill and channel catfish. 
  • Mitchell Pond
  • Mound Pond: (34.8 acres) This pond and yellepit pond location: near the NW side of McNary Reservoir, 15 miles SE from Kennewick. species: smallmouth and largemouth bass, crappie and yellow perch.
  • Switch Pond
  • Wallulla Lake
  • Wellsian Pond
  • Yellepit Pond (36.3 acres): This pond and Mound pond are location: on the NW side of McNary Reservoir, 15 miles SE from Kennewick. They hold smallmouth and largemouth bass, crappie and yellow perch.

Chelan County

  • Airplane Lakes
  • Augusta Lake
  • Antilon Lake: A 96 acre reservoir 5 miles north of Manson on Grade Creek Rd just past Roses and Wapato lakes. Holds brown trout.
  • Battalion Lake
  • Beehive Reservoir (12 acres): This small lake 7 miles southwest of Wenatchee has a fair carry-over of rainbows and eastern brook trout, and is planted with catchable rainbow as weather and conditions allow. 
  • Big Jim Lakes
  • Black Lake
  • Canaan Lake
  • Caroline Lake
  • Chelan Lake: Good fishing for nice-sized kokanee is expected from mid-April through June. In June and July, catchable-size rainbow are planted in the lower lake near Chelan/Manson. Some fine wild trout fishing, mostly for rainbow, is available throughout the upper lake basin above 25 Mile Creek beginning in early spring. Trophy anglers will find fair-to-good opportunity to catch both landlocked chinook salmon and lake trout (mackinaw) in the spring and early summer months. Burbot (freshwater ling) offer excellent fishing opportunities from February through April, with jig fishing extremely popular in the Manson/Wapato Point area. A limited smallmouth bass fishery exists. Although most of the lake is open year-around, the upper end and numerous tributary stream-mouths are closed during April, May and June to protect pre-spawning adult trout; check the current regulations pamphlet carefully for details.
  • Chiwaukum Lake
  • Choral Lake
  • Clear Lake (5 acres)
  • This small lake is 8 miles south of Wenatchee. There is a fair carry-over of both rainbows and eastern brook trout. It is planted with catchable rainbows as weather and road conditions allow. The season opens last Saturday in April.
  • Colchuck Lake
  • Cortez Lake (34 acres): location: 5.7 miles southeast of Wenatchee and 1.3 miles southwest of Malaga. Also known as Three lakes. This is a spiny ray lake, also, crappie, bluegill, brown bullhead and perch. There are some walleye in there also. but has no access. No motorized boats allows, you can use electric trolling motors.
  • Domke Lake
  • Donald Lake
  • Dry Lake (80+ acres): although this lake has a maximum depth of 11 feet it can be good fishing for largemouth Bass, large crappie, also has yellow perch, brown bullhead and Bluegill. Public access is from a rough road side site suited for hand carried craft only. To get there from Chelan, travel northwest on Highway #150 for 6.4 miles to Wapato Lake Road. Turn right onto Wapato Lake Road for three miles to the Kanei Resort on the west end of Wapato Lake. Turn sharp left onto Dry Lake Road for  .6 mile to rough road side parking and boat launch area.
  • Edna Lake
  • Elsey Lake
  • Enchanted Lakes
  • Ethel Lake
  • Fish Lake (approximately 500 acres): one mile NE of Lake Wenatchee. It holds rainbows, brown, and eastern brook trout. Also perch, small and largemouth bass. 

    Local Info

    The Cove Resort   509-763-3130.


  • Flora Lake
  • Heather Lake
  • King Lake
  • Klonaqua Lakes
  • Lichtenwasser Lake
  • Lily Lake (15 acres): This small lake 8 miles south of Wenatchee has a fair carry-over of both rainbows and eastern brook trout. It is planted with hatchery rainbows as weather and road conditions allow. Catch-and-release, selective fishery regulations are in effect most of the open season.
  • Meadow Lake (36 acres): 
  • Merritt Lake
  • Mirror Lake
  • Myrtle Lake
  • Rock Lake
  • Roses Lake (1120 acres)
  • Schaefer Lake
  • Swimming Deer Lake
  • Three Lake
  • Top Lake
  • Trap Lake
  • Trapper Lake
  • Trout Lake
  • Wapato Lake (216 acres): This lake has a maximum depth of 68 feet. fish species:  largemouth bass, crapppie, bluegill and larger rainbow trout. There are 2 resorts on the lake. Public access is provided by the Washington State Department of Fish and Wild-life Department. The large access area has lots of parking space, pit toilets and a very good concrete block boat launching ramp. To get to Wapato Lake from Chelan, take Highway #150 northwest for 6.4 miles to Wapato Lake Road. Turn right onto Wapato Lake Road for 2.5 miles to Paradise Lake Resort sign. Turn right for.2 mile to WDFW public access.

Local Info

Kanei Resort 509-687-3690 

Paradise Resort 509 687-3444


  • Wenatchee Lake (2,445 acres): This natural lake 15 miles north of Leavenworth should produce small kokanee beginning in April, with a generous catch limit on kokanee. Anglers are reminded to carefully release all bull trout (Dolly Varden) caught. Bull trout are a species of concern and thus their season is closed throughout most of the state. Wenatchee Lake is the main rearing area for these native char in the Wenatchee basin. 

Clark County

  • Battle Ground Lake - fish species: eastern brook trout, rainbow trout, some warmwater fish (30 acres): location: inside a park just north of  Battle Ground, this lake offers good bank access and a state boat launch. Has planted rainbow trout, including a few jumbos (10-12 inches) and broodstock (20-26 inches), plus eastern brook trout. A few Largemouth bass are also caught. Internal combustion motors are not allowed. 

    Local Info

    Battle Ground State Park  (360) 687-4521


  • Campbell Lake
  • Canvasback Lake
  • Carty Lake
  • Dead Lake
  • Fargher Pond (3 acres): This small pond north of Battle Ground is scheduled to receive a plant of brown trout in the spring. Fargher remains fishable well into the fall, and is open year-around.
  • Green Lake
  • Klineline Ponds - fish species: rainbow trout, brown trout, cutthroat, steelhead some species of warmwater fish: location: along I-5 next to Salmon Creek, north of Hazel Dell. No flotation devices allowed on the lake.
  • Lacamas Lake - rainbow trout, brown trout, yellow perch, bass and other varieties of warmwater fish. location: north of Camas, this year-round lake should be good for stocked brown trout up to 14 inches after the spring planting. Fair-to-good action for largemouth bass, yellow perch, bluegill, brown bullheads, and a few channel catfish and pumpkinseed sunfish is available. The access area is small and caution needs to be taken when launching boats. Resorts and public shoreline provide access for bank anglers. 
  • Lancaster Lake
  • Lost Lake
  • Merwin Lake Reservoir (4090 acres): This North Fork Lewis River impoundment location: near  Ariel is shared by Clark and Cowlitz counties, with 2,400 acres in Clark County and 1,690 in Cowlitz. Landlocked coho salmon and kokanee are the main target. Merwin Lake is a favorite hotspot for anglers seeking E-XTRA LARGE Kokanee Salmon and recent plants of Tiger Muskie. There is a very nice day use area here and further up the Lake is large campground with camping spaces for RV's and tent campers. Merwin is open for fishing all year long, and is a very good spot to view bald eagles and other wildlife. Water levels fluctuate a great deal during non peak season times so before bringing your boat a great distance, you may want to check on the water level to make sure you can launch your boat.
  • Mud Lake
  • Post Office Lake
  • Round Lake
  • Vancouver Lake - channel catfish, bass, yellow perch, bluegill, carp.
    Widgeon Lake
  • Yale Reservoir - kokanee, some cutthroat trout. (315 acres):  (3,802 acres): This North Fork Lewis River reservoir has 2,023 acres in Clark County and 1,779 acres in Cowlitz County. Kokanee fishing is the main attraction. Shallow fishing for kokanee is best in the spring and fall; in the summer, deep fishing is the rule. Some cutthroat trout are caught near the mouth of Siouxon Creek, and Yale also has a few bull trout. All bull trout and Dolly Varden must be released. Boat ramps are available at Saddle Dam, Yale, Cougar Camp and Beaver Bay. The lake is open to fishing year-round. 

    Local Info

    Call 1-800-547-1501 for current reservoir levels


Clallam County

  • Adwell Lake (240 acres): This lake 5 miles southwest of Port Angeles is fair for wild rainbows, especially during the summer. Some brook trout are also available. State access with boat launch and two toilets. Check the regulations pamphlet for special regulations. 
  • Beaver Lake (44 acres)
  • location:  11 miles south of Clallam Bay, this small lake is good for 6- to 10-inch cutthroat. Yellow perch are also reported to be present.
  • Blake Ponds
  • Cresent Lake: Contained within Olympic National Park, Crescent Lake is regulated by the National Park Service. The lake has unique populations of rainbow (Beardslee) and cutthroat (crescenti) trout.

    Local Info

    Olympic National Park Information

    Call 360 452-4501 for current information.


  • Dickey Lake: (500 acres)  location: 4 miles east of Lake Ozette, consult an up to date gazetteer for lumbering roads to the lake. 
  • Lizard Lake
  • Ozette Lake: Ozette is within Olympic National Park and regulated by the National Park Service. Trout, Yellow perch and a few largemouth bass are reportedly present.
  • Pleasant Lake (500 acres): location: along Highway 101  8 miles northeast of Forks, Pleasant Lake provides fair opportunity for cutthroat, with kokanee fishing improving later in the spring. There is a 20-inch maximum length limit on kokanee. The lake is open to fishing year-around.
  • Sutherland Lake (370 acres): This lake 10 miles southwest of Port Angeles should be good for cutthroat and rainbow up to 12 inches or larger. Also good to excellent kokanee fishing. There is a state access with boat launch and two toilets available. The lake is open to fishing year-around.
  • Undi Lake
  • Wentworth Lake: 53 acre lake that holds rainbow trout.  7 miles NW of Forks on Dickey River Road.

Columbia County

  • Curl Lake (3 acres): This small lake off the Tucannon River is used as a steelhead smolt acclimation pond, so it opens late (June 1). A big plant of rainbow trout catchables makes for steady summer fishing. 
  • Dam Pond: location: just above Little Goose Dam, this small pond off the Snake River gets rainbow trout catchables for early-season fishing.
  • Dayton Juvenile Pond
  • Dayton Juvenile Pond: As its name suggests, this is a juveniles-only fishing pond in  Dayton. It gets an annual plant of catchable-size rainbow trout.
  • Orchard Pond
  • Orchard Pond: This Snake River pond near the Lyons Ferry Marina provides early fishing on a small plant of rainbow trout catchables.
  • Tucannon Lakes: Beaver, Big Four, Blue, Deer, Rainbow, Spring, and Watson Lakes: These small, bank-fishing-only lakes off the Tucannon River are stocked with rainbow trout yearlings for an early (March 1) opener. However, weather determines when the ponds fill and can be planted. Ice and winter floods this year have delayed planting until May. Big Four, which is for fly-fishing only, gets surplus rainbow broodstock. All have public access. 

    Cowlitz County
  • Blue Lake
  • Carlisle Lake
  • Castle Lake: location: In the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, Castle Lake requires a 20-plus mile drive over rough logging roads, followed by a tough hike down a steep hillside to the lake. The key to finding the lake is to first find the Weyerhaeuser 3000 road. Would-be anglers not familiar with the area should get a St. Helens West hunting map, published by the Washington Forest Protection Association. Those who put forth the effort have a chance to catch dandy-size rainbow trout; fish up to 10 pounds have been reported. This is a self-sustaining fishery, with no fish planted, so selective gear rules are in effect, along with a one-fish, 16-inch minimum size limit. The lake is open year-round, but the road in is usually blocked by snow until at least May.
  • Coldwater Lake (700 acres): location: in the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument off SR 504, Coldwater Lake was formed by a debris dam resulting from the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Skamania and Cowlitz counties share this lake, but the main access is in Cowlitz County. Rainbow trout fingerlings stocked in the late 1980s have grown to impressive size, and have begun reproducing on their own. No additional planting is planned. Cutthroat trout, apparent survivors of the eruption, also inhabit the lake. Selective fishery regulations are in effect, with a one-fish limit and 16-inch minimum size limit. Electric fishing motors are allowed. Coldwater opened to excellent fishing in summer 1993, with limited shoreline access provided by the U.S. Forest Service. A boat launch, fish cleaning station, and nature walk were completed in 1994. Although the lake is open to fishing all year, access may not be available during winter. 

Local Info

Access Information for 

Mount St. Helens 306-247-5473 


  • Coweeman Lake
  • Fawn Lake
  • Horseshoe Lake: fish species: rainbow trout, cutthroat, steelhead some species of warmwater fish. (80 acres): location: in  Woodland, and has a public boat launch. Horseshoe Lake also supports populations of largemouth bass and a few other warmwater fish. 
  • Kress Lake - rainbow trout, brown trout, cutthroat, steelhead, bluegill, yellow perch, warmouth, bass. (30 acres): location: near I-5 and the Kalama River Road. Kress holds largemouth Bass, bluegill and pumpkinseed sunfish. Be sure to check your regulations for size limits. Boat access is available for cartop boats only; gasoline motors are not allowed. Lots of bank access. 
  • Lakeview Peak Lake
  • McBride's Lake (9 acres): location: near Mt St Helens. It contains mostly brook trout with a few cutthroat and rainbows in the lake too. There are no special regs on the lake but please do not use bait unless you plan on keeping fish. The average fish is 6-8 inches with a very few fish between 12-14 inches.
  • Merrill Lake (344 acres): Fly-fishing-only.location: north of Cougar near Mount St. Helens. Merrill contains coastal cutthroat, brown trout to several pounds, and some rainbow trout. Special bag and size limits are in effect; please check the regulations pamphlet. Internal combustion engines are prohibited on boats that are used for fishing. Merrill is open year-round, but action is usually slow during the winter months. There is a DNR campground and boat ramp.
  • Merwin Reservoir (4090 acres): This North Fork Lewis River impoundment. location: near  Ariel is shared by Clark and Cowlitz counties, with 2,400 acres in Clark County and 1,690 in Cowlitz. Landlocked coho salmon and kokanee are the main target. Angling is best in early spring, with fish in the 10-inch class. Small northern squawfish can be numerous and pesky. Tiger muskies were planted in 1995 to help control squawfish populations. There is a 36-inch minimum size limit on the muskies.
  • Sacajewea Lake - rainbow trout, bass, other varieties of warmwater fish.
    (48 acres): This lake within Longview's city limits is open all year, and provides an excellent fishery for largemouth bass, yellow perch, bluegill, and other sunfish. Sacajawea is usually stocked in early spring with good numbers of catchable-size rainbow and brown trout, plus a few broodstock and jumbo rainbows. Another rainbow plant is planned for Free Fishing Weekend in June. Electric motors may be used with permission from the Longview Parks Department; gasoline motors are not allowed. 
  • Silver Lake - rainbow trout, bass, bluegill, yellow perch, crappie and other varieties of warmwater fish.  (3,000 acres): location: between Castle Rock and Toutle, Silver Lake is open year-round. This is considered by some to be the best largemouth bass lake in western Washington. There is a 14-inch minimum size limit on bass. Silver also provides good-to-excellent fishing for yellow perch, bluegills, brown bullheads and crappies. Some pumpkinseed sunfish and warmouth are also taken. Grass carp planted in 1992 have reduced the aquatic vegetation. Anglers are reminded that regulations prohibit the taking of grass carp. Because of the reduction in aquatic weeds, rainbow trout are being planted again, with 10,000 catchable-size trout set for release this spring. A few trout are also available as a result of natural production in the tributaries. A WDFW boat access is available with a small dock, as are ramps and boat rentals at private resorts. 
  • Spirit Lake
  • Yale Reservoir: Yale Reservoir (3,802 acres): Please refer to Clark County, which holds the majority of this North Fork Lewis River impoundment.

Douglas County

  • Grimes Lake (124 acres): fishing is expected to be good for Lahontan cutthroat trout up to five pounds. location:  5 miles southeast of Mansfield, Grimes has selective fishery regulations in addition to the short summer-only season. Parking is limited.
  • Jameson Lake (332 acres): Fishing has been excellent for yearling rainbow trout to 11 inches during previous seasons, with some carry-overs to 3 pounds. Success this year should be fair-to-good depending on water clarity and temperatures. There are resorts and a large public access with camping area. In normal years, large crowds should be expected for both split season openers. Also camping spots, dirt paths, gravel paths, big area.
  • Rock Island Ponds: Rock Island ponds: Bordering  Rock Island, these year-round waters are managed primarily for bass and bluegill. A rehabilitation was done a few years ago to remove stunted perch and sunfish that were limiting growth of bass and bluegill. Unfortunately, illegal re-introductions have been made, and bass/bluegill populations are growing slowly, but should offer limited catches of bass over 12 inches and bluegill 7 to 8 inches. Catchable-size (10 inches) rainbow trout are stocked annually in March and just prior to Free Fishing Weekend in June. Expect fair rainbow fishing this year.
  • Rufus Woods Lake: This is a long stretch of the Columbia River between Grand Coulee Dam and Chief Joseph Dam.

Ferry County

  • Bourgea Lake
  • Cady Lake
  • Curlew Lake: Curlew Lake (870 acres): Spring and early summer fishing for planted rainbow trout should be excellent at this popular year-round lake just north of Republic. Largemouth bass will hit later in the summer and fall. Resorts, camping, picnicking, and public boat access are all available at Curlew Lake State Park. This lake holds rainbows and eastern brooks. There are also largemouth bass. Take Hwy 21 leading north from Republic to and along the north shore. 

    Local Info:

    Fisherman's Cove 509-775-3641


  • Davis Lake (17 acres): This small lake northwest of Boyds offers 9- to 12-inch cutthroat trout from annual fry plants. A few rainbow trout may remain from earlier plants made due to a shortage of cutthroat. A Forest Service campground is available. Open season runs from the last Saturday in April to the end of October. The lake may not be accessible on opening day due to unusually heavy snowfall this past winter.
  • Elbow Lake
  • Ellen Lake (78 acres): Annual rainbow trout fry plants usually provide excellent fishing here. location: 14 miles north of Inchelium, Ellen receives lots of fishing pressure because of a developed Forest Service campground. Empire Lakes (6 acres total).
  • Eastern brook trout fry plants are regularly made in these small lakes in the Colville National Forest, and anglers can expect to land 8-inchers by the opener.
  • Emerald Lakes
  • Ferry Lake (19 acres): location: 9 miles south of Republic on Highway 21, up Scatter Creek Road to the west. A Forest Service campground is available.
  • Fish Lake (4 acres): This little alpine lake, at 3,300 feet elevation, gets an annual plant of catchable-size rainbow trout. location: 2 miles south of Ferry Lake by county road. Open season is from the last Saturday in April through October 31.
  • La Fleur Lake
  • Long Lake (14 acres): Fry-planted cutthroat trout at this fly-fishing-only lake should give those anglers some 9- to 17-inch catches, especially by fall. Long Lake is southwest of Republic in the Scatter Creek drainage and has a Forest Service campground and boat launch. Motorized boats are not allowed. Open season is last Saturday in April to the end of October.
  • Mud Lake: location:  1 1/2 miles NW of Republic. 
  • Renner Lake:(9.6 acres): This small lake (2,525 feet) is stocked occasionally with brown trout catchables and brook trout fry. location: two miles west from Barstow and six miles south from Orient. There is a small Forest Service campground and a primitive boat launch site. Access is a walk-in of  one-half mile. 
  • Round Lake
  • San Poil Lake: location:  3 1/2 miles north east of Republic on Hwy 21, holds rainbow and eastern brook trout. On the road to Curlew lake.
  • Sherman Lake
  • Swan Lake (52 acres): Rainbow trout fingerling plants will keep this high-elevation (3,641 feet) lake producing 9-inch yearlings and 11- to 13-inch carry-overs throughout the season. Swan also provides some action on largemouth bass. The lake is southwest of Republic up the Scatter Creek drainage, just a few miles east of the Okanogan County line. An improved Forest Service campground is on the east shore. Open season runs from the last Saturday in April to October 31.
  • Trout Lake (8 acres): Rainbow trout fry go into this little lake,  8 miles west of Kettle Falls at the southeast end of Hoodoo Canyon, to give anglers some nice-size trout early on. There is a boat launch at the Forest Service campground. 
  • Twin Lakes
  • Ward Lakes (7 acres): Spring angling action should be good here for eastern brook trout if winter-kill is not a problem. location: 9-1/2 miles north of Republic, and has a traditional April opener.

Franklin County

  • Camp Lake
  • Charlene Lake
  • Clark Pond (49.3 acres): location: five miles SW of Mesa is planted annually in spring with catchable-size trout. Fishing is fairly good, but short-lived. Open season is year-around.
  • Dalton Lake (30 acres): location: 11 north of Pasco on the Kahlotus road.It is planted in spring with catchable-size rainbows. Fishing is good but short-lived, although the pond is open year-around.
  • Emma Lake (20 acres): location: outside Page,  seven miles northeast of Ice Harbor Dam. It has largemouth and smallmouth bass, black crappie, yellow perch and bullhead catfish. Emma is open to fishing year-round.
  • Kahlotus Lake: llocation: on Hwy 260, near town of Kahlotus. Holds large mouth bass, black crappie, perch, and bullhead. Has public access.
  • Marmes Pond (3 acres): This small pond near the mouth of the Palouse River is stocked with rainbow trout in March. It is open to fishing year-round.
  • Mesa Lake: (50 acres): location: This lake  one mile southwest of  Mesa fish species: largemouth bass, black crappie, yellow perch, walleye and bullhead catfish. Recent WDFW sampling found that yellow perch are the most abundant game fish. Open to fishing year-round.
  • Powerline: (Barker) Lake (22 acres) location: on WDFW-managed Windmill Ranch Unit, eight miles northwest of Mesa. Good fishing for small largemouth bass, yellow perch, black crappie and brown bullhead catfish. Designated parking area and walk-in access only ( 2-1/2 miles).
  • Railroad Pond (10 acres)
  • Railroad Pond (10 acres): This small pond two miles northeast of Mesa has been converted from a production water to a quality trout fishery, starting May 1, 2000. New regulations (check the 2000-2001 regulations pamphlet) and large trout are expected to attract anglers who enjoy catch-and-release fishing with flies and lures. Rainbow trout will run from 8 to 18 inches. In addition, Railroad Pond has been selected to receive a bonus plant of large trout as part of a special program passed by the state legislature. These triploid rainbow trout averaging 1-1/2 pounds each are purchased by the Department of Fish and Wildlife. Because they are sterile triploids, fish that "carry over" have the possibility to grow to trophy size.
  • Scooteney Reservoir (925 acres)
  • Yellow perch are the main attraction on this enlargement of Potholes Canal. Smallmouth and largemouth bass, crappie, yellow perch and walleye are also available. Most fishing is during the winter through the ice. An excellent campground on the west side has a developed access area and toilets. The season is open year-around. location: 12 miles southwest of Othello.
  • Sulpher Lake
  • Worth Lake (10 acres): This small lake four miles northwest of  Mesa has a variety of warmwater fish, including largemouth bass, bluegill, black crappie, yellow perch and bullhead catfish. It is open to fishing year-round.

Garfield County

  • Bakers Pond
  • Baker's Pond: This small farm pond in the Pataha Creek/Tucannon River drainage is stocked with catchable-size rainbow trout, so it's great for young anglers. Reached via Highway 28 and Mountain Road, public access is through the cooperation of local farmers. The pond is open all year.
  • Casey Pond: location: off the Snake River gets a small plant of catchable-size (10-12 inch) rainbow trout that provide some early season action only, although the pond is open to fishing all year.

Grant County

  • Alkali Lake: (320 acres) location: nine miles north of Soap Lake on Hwy 17. Contains spiny rays and rainbows. Public access.
  • Ancient Lakes
  • Banks Lake (24,900 acres): This is the best walleye water in the region and is popular with anglers statewide. Kokanee have been planted for several years, but have received only light pressure from anglers. A cooperative rainbow trout rearing project between WDFW, an Electric City sportsmen's group and Coulee City Chamber of Commerce offers improved trout fishing, with fish running to 5 pounds. Largemouth bass fishing should be good to excellent. Abundant smallmouth bass up to 4 pounds are available along rocky shoreline areas. Yellow perch and lake whitefish are very abundant. Crappie fishing will be poor-to-fair. Several public access areas are well developed, including a state park  mid-way up the lake and a city park at Coulee City on the south end. This large lake is open to fishing year-around.
  • Beda Lake
  • Blue Lake (532 acres): Anglers can expect only fair catches of 10- to 11-inch rainbow trout, with occasional carry-overs of 15 to 19 inches. The lake will be stocked lightly (35,000) with catchable-size trout. Fry survival has been poor due to excessive numbers of competing yellow perch. Blue is being proposed for rehabilitation this fall. There are three resorts and a public access with toilets. Open season is from the last Saturday in April to October 31. 

    Local Info

    Coulee Lodge  509 632-5565


  • Blythe Lake: A 30 acre lake on the Columbia Wildlife Refuge, it contains rainbows. Reached by road from west end of O'Sullivan Dam.
  • Burke Lake
  • Caliche Lakes: Two small lakes with rainbow trout. 5.5 miles SW of George, take exit 143, then NE on Frontage Road 1.4 miles. Public Access.
  • Canal Lake: A lake of 76 acres, holds rainbow trout. Three miles east from the east end of O'Sullivan Dam then turn south four miles to Heart Lake. Canal is adjacent.
  • Castle Lake
  • Chukar Lake
  • Clementine Lake
  • Corral Lake: This is an 80 acre lake formed by seepage from the Potholes Reservoir. It has a boat launch and holds rainbow trout. Reached by the road from the west end of O'Sullivan Dam.
  • Crater Lake
  • Cresent Bay Lake: A 90 acre man made lake that holds a nice variety of perch, crappie, walleye, whitefish, large and small mouth bass. Public access, 1/2 mile east of city of Grand Coulee.
  • Deep Lake: 104 acre lake that holds rainbow, mackinaw, and kokanee. location: 5 miles SW of Coulee City on Hwy 17in Sun Lakes State Park.
  • Dry Falls Lake (99 acres): This lake should provide good-to-excellent fishing for yearling rainbow trout and some large carry-overs. Brown trout may make up 5-10 percent of the catch. A one-fish limit and selective fishery regulations are in effect. The lake is accessible with car-topped boats, but there is no actual launch. Toilets are available. Open season runs from the last Saturday in April to November 30.
  • Dusty Lake: Small, 30 acre lake that holds rainbows and brown trout. It is part of the Quincy W.R.A. and can be reached seven miles SW of  Quincy. A trail leads from Burke lake 1/2 mile to Dusty.
  • Ephrata Lake
  • Evergreen Reservoir: Evergreen Reservoir (235 acres): Largemouth bass, bluegill and perch are the main attractions, with some walleye and crappie taken too. An occasional tiger musky adds excitement, but they must be 36 inches long to keep. Open season is year-round.
  • Falcon Lakes, Heron Lakes, Goldeneye Lake: A group of small lakes on the Columbia Wildlife Refugee near the west end of O'Sullivan Dam. Holds rainbow trout.
  • Flat Lake
  • Goldeneye Lake
  • location: 1/2 mile south of the O'Sullivan Dam, holds rainbows.
  • Goose Lakes: Leave the hwy at the east end of O'Sullivan Dam, go  three miles. Both lakes have public boat launches. Both hold rainbow, lg. mouth bass, crappie, and bullhead. Lower Goose also holds perch, while Upper Goose holds Lahontan cutthroat and walleye.
  • Hampton Lakes: Hampton lakes, Upper (53 acres) and Lower (19 acres): Both of these lakes on the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge north of Othello should be only fair for rainbow trout. Yearlings have been rather large, running 13 to 14 inches, and carry-overs average 18 inches. Open season runs from March 1 to July 31.
  • Heart Lake: Heart Lake is a 20 acre hike-in lake, part of an area known as the Potholes. Drive 3 miles east from the O'Sullivan Dam and then turn south four miles. Local stores have maps of the potholes lakes, which number over 20. Special seasons and regulations often apply.
  • Hourglass Lake
  • June Lake
  • Lemna Lake
  • Lenice Lake (94 acres): Planted rainbow trout carry over well here and should provide catches in the 13- to 19-inch range; brown trout are also available. Selective fishery regulations apply; check the regulations pamphlet. Access is on foot (one-half mile walk) with toilets at parking area.
  • Lenore Lake (1,670 acres): location: just north of  Soap Lake, Lenore offers trophy fishing for Lahontan cutthroat trout up to 10 pounds, but most fish average two to five pounds. Fishing is catch-and-release only from March 1 through May 31, and should be good during this period. Selective fishery regulations apply for the entire open season, which runs to November 30. Anglers should check the regulations pamphlet and also note posted closed areas at the north and south ends. Lenore has four access areas, three with rough boat launches and toilets.
  • Long Lake Reservoir
  • Mallard Lake
  • Marco Polo Lake
  • Martha Lake: (22 acres) location: on the south side of Hwy 90  a mile NE of  George. It contains rainbows.
  • Merry Lake (40 acres): Rainbow trout average 14 inches, with carry-overs in the 16- to 19-inch range. Merry has selective fishery regulations, and an April 27 to October 31 open season (which will change to a March 1 opening in 1997). Foot access is from the Lenice Lake parking area.
  • Mirror Lake:
  • Moses Lake (6800 acres): Fair action will be available on rainbow trout up to 17 inches, plus some largemouth bass. Good catches of walleye can also be expected. Moses has a very large population of 2 to 3 pound lake whitefish that are under-utilized. Crappie and bluegill fishing will be poor; note that crappie and bluegill have a 5-fish catch limit and minimum size regulations. Perch fishing is spotty; the population is large, but fish appear to be stunted. Intensive biological surveys are underway to learn more  the decline of the warmwater fishery here, and to develop possible management improvements. Moses Lake has several public boat launches, two with picnic facilities.
  • Northrup Lake
  • Para-Juvenile Lake
  • Park Lake (346 acres): location: north of  Soap Lake in Sun Lakes State Park, this popular lake was rehabilitated in the fall of 1996, and excellent fisheries occurred in 1998 and 1999. Over 120,000 rainbow and brown trout fry should form the basis of a very good fishery on 10-1/2 to 11-inch yearlings. A good crop of carry-over rainbows in the 14- to 16-inch range can also be expected. In addition to the state park, there is a resort. Open season runs from the last Saturday in April through September 30.
  • Perch Lake (16 acres): This small lake in Sun Lakes State Park should provide good fishing for rainbows. Because it's small and receives intense pressure, catch rates will drop off markedly after the first few days of the season. Opening day is the last Saturday in April, and the season runs through September 30. Most angling occurs from shore, although small boats can be carried to the water.
  • Pillar Lake
  • Pit Lake
  • Potholes Reservoir: (23,000 acres): fish species:  trout, largemouth and smallmouth bass, walleye, yellow perch, crappie and bluegill. The reservoir is open to fishing year-round, with the best time for warmwater species in mid-summer through fall. The main reservoir and Lind Coulee arm are also popular for fishing through the ice. Crappie and bluegill have a combined daily catch limit of 25 fish. A large private resort, a state park, and several developed public access areas provide all the necessary amenities.

    Local Info

    Mardon Resort


  • Priest Rapids Reservoir
  • Quincy Wildlife area Lakes: location: near Quincy off White Trail Road. Dusty Lake and the small pothole lakes west of the main access road will offer only fair rainbow trout fishing this year. Quincy and Burke lakes were rehabilitated in the fall of 1999. Catchable-size rainbow trout (8 to 9 inches) were stocked prior to the March 1, 2000 opening. Cold water temperatures often make for slow fishing in March, especially so on catchable trout stocked this early. By late March or early April, though, angling success should really blossom. The normal annual release of fingerling rainbow later in the spring will provide a good-to-excellent fishery in spring of 2001. The hike into Dusty through this scenic area is worth the effort for large carry-overs. Stan Coffin, H, and part of the Ancient lakes were rehabilitated in the fall of 1992 to remove carp. They were restocked with bass and bluegill fingerlings in 1993 to improve warmwater fishing opportunity in the Quincy area. Angling for these species should be fair. Refer to a separate listing for Evergreen Reservoir. Check the regulations pamphlet for individual lake seasons.
  • Rainbow Lake
  • Red Rock Lake
  • Round Lake
  • Sage Lakes
  • Sand Lake
  • Seep Lakes: location: south of  Moses Lake and Potholes Reservoir. Most are open year-round, except the Warden lakes and some of the lakes on the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge. Many of the larger lakes among these waters were rehabilitated during fall 1997 to remove stunted warmwater fish populations, mostly pumpkinseed sunfish. Windmill, Canal, Heart, Corral and Blythe lakes have since provided very good fishing. North and South Teal were rehabilitated in fall of 1999, and will yield good fishing again in 2001. Also check out some of the smaller, out-of-the-way lakes in this same area. These are walk-in lakes at distances of one-fourth to 1-1/4 miles from parking. Check the regulations pamphlet for specific lake seasons. Larger lakes have boat launches, and some of these are equipped with toilets. Please refer to separate descriptions for Upper and Lower Hampton and Warden lakes.
  • Shoveler Lake
  • Soda Lake: Soda Lake (180 acres) and Long Lake (75 acres): These adjacent lakes should both provide fair fishing for walleye, rainbow trout, bass, and yellow perch. Both are open to fishing year-round. Soda has good whitefish catches in late summer and fall, and several very large rainbow trout (5-8 pounds!) are taken here each year. There are two access areas, one with toilets; rough camping is allowed.
  • Stan Coffen Lake
  • Spring Lakes
  • Stratford Lakes
  • Susan Lake
  • Teal Lakes
  • Thompson Lake
  • Trail Lake
  • Vic Meyers Lake: Vic Meyers (Rainbow) Lake (8 acres): Anglers should find a limited number of excellent rainbow and brook trout in this small, popular lake. Like nearby Perch Lake, it receives heavy pressure and fishing will not hold up past the first few days of the season. Open from the last Saturday in April to September 30.
  • Virgin Lake
  • Wanapum Reservoir
  • Warden Lake: (186 acres) and South Warden (24 acres) lakes: Rehabilitated in fall of 1998 and restocked with fry in 1999, these two should offer a fair-to-good fishery in 2000 for rainbow and brown trout. Rainbows in the 10-inch range should be plentiful. Early-season (March 1 opener) action may be slow due to cold water temperatures, but angling should really pick up in April. New regulations will affect Warden and South Warden, keeping the season open through the end of September. The opening date will be later in 2001, starting the last Saturday in April.
  • Widgeon Lake
  • Williams Lake
  • Willow Lakes
  • Winchester Wasteway Reservoir
  • Windmill Lake

Grays Harbor County

  • Aberdeen Lake: (63 acres): Fishing should be good for 10- to 11- inch rainbow trout with occasional larger rainbows and cutthroat available. Access is through the city park. Aberdeen Lake (also called Lake Aberdeen) will be crowded on opening day. Open season runs from the last Saturday in April to October 31.
  • Carlisle Lakes
  • Damon Lake
  • Discovery Lakes
  • Duck Lake: (450 acres): location: near Ocean Shores, Duck Lake offers fair fishing for stocked rainbow trout, and good fishing for largemouth bass, black crappie and bluegill. It is open to fishing year-around. Parking and boat launches are available, maintained and patrolled by the city.
  • Failor Lake: (65 acres): Public access to this reservoir nine miles north of Hoquiam is now open from Highway 101. Anglers should find good fishing for stocked rainbow trout. Failor has also been selected to receive a bonus plant of large triploid rainbow trout (averaging 1-1/2 pounds apiece). These sterile fish can grow to trophy size if not harvested. Open season is from the last Saturday in April through October 31.
  • Grisdale Pond
  • Klone Lakes: These three small lakes are in beautiful surroundings above Wynoochee Reservoir. Ranging in size from two to nine acres, they are planted with trout every three to four years. They require some effort to reach, and although they are open to fishing all year, elevation (all at  3,200 feet) may keep them closed part of the year.
  • Mill Creek Pond: This juveniles-only water location: in Cosmopolis provides accessible fishing for beginning anglers. It is open to fishing year-round.
  • Pope Lakes
  • Quinault Lake
  • Satsop Lakes: These two small lakes at  2,500 feet elevation provide fishing for small cutthroat and brook trout following an enjoyable walk through large timber. Last Saturday in April through October 31 open season.
  • Shye Lake
  • Stump Lake
  • Sylvia Lake: (32 acres): Good spring, early summer and fall fishing for 9- to 10-inch rainbow trout, with a few larger rainbows and cutthroat available. The first fish stocking will be in mid-March. This popular lake receives additional trout for Free Fishing Weekend in June, and plants in April, May and September. Excess adult hatchery steelhead may be periodically available. These steelhead count as part of the daily trout limit, and a catch record card is not required to take them. Open season is year-round.
  • Vance Creek Lake
  • Wynoochee Lake (Reservoir): Cutthroat and whitefish will provide action for anglers on this Wynoochee River impoundment. Special size and catch limits are in effect for trout, with a June 1 through October 31 season. USFS campground, toilets and boat launch.

Island County

  • Admiralty Bay Pond
  • Cranberry Lake: (125 acres) 25 ft deep and elevation of 20 feet. fish species: largemouth bass, yellow perch, brown bullhead catfish and planted rainbow and brown trout. Public access is through Deception Pass State Park. No internal combustion engines are allowed on the lake. The state park also provides a fishing dock. The boat launch is best used to carry in boats. The state park provides 246 camp sites.
  • Deer Lake (82 acres): location: 1 mile west of Clinton on Whidbey Island, Deer lake has a WDFW access on the northeast corner of the lake. Fishing is usually good to very good for stocked catchable-size rainbows, and "holdover" cutthroat to 16 inches or larger. Open season is from the last Saturday in April through October 31.
  • Dugualla Bay Lake
  • Goss Lake: (55 acres) location: 3 miles west of Langley on Whidbey Island, Goss has a WDFW access on the east end of the lake. Expect fair to good fishing for recently-stocked catchable-size rainbows, with a large cutthroat trout as well. Trout size is reduced due to competing brown bullheads. Last Saturday in April through October 31 season.
  • Gravel Pit Ponds
  • Holmes Lake
  • Lone Lake: (92 acres) This lake is 2 miles southwest of Langley on Whidbey Island, Lone has a large WDFW access on the north shore and is open year-around. Trout fishing can vary widely from year-to-year due to cormorant predation, but is expected to be superb in 1996 for catchable-size (8-10 inch) rainbow trout, plus very fat yearlings (12 inches) and some holdovers (2+ pounds). Table quality of the trout is best in spring and fall when the water is cooler. Use large-fish methods here: salad shrimp bait, leech wet fly patterns, and large lures. Some catchables will be stocked after May 1st to avoid bird predation.
  • Oliver Lake
  • Orr's Pond
  • Pondilla Lake
  • Silver Lake

Jefferson County

  • Anderson Lake
  • Brown's Lake
  • Crocker Lake
  • Devil's Lake
  • Fulton Creek Beaver Ponds
  • Horseshoe Lake
  • Jupiter Lakes
  • Leland Lake
  • Lena Lake
  • Lost Lake
  • Ludlow Lake
  • Sandy Shore Lake
  • Silent Lake
  • Silver Lakes
  • Tarboo Lake
  • Teal Lake
  • Twin Lake, upper
  • Yoho Lake

King County

  • Alice Lake: (33 acres): This lake is 30 feet deep at it's deepest point. It holds, Largemouth Bass and Rainbow. Has a good concrete ramp boat launch, Pit toilets and lots of parking space. No internal combustion engines are allowed on this lake. From Issaquah, going east on I-90, take the Preston-fall city road for 3.9 miles to the Lake Alice Road S.E. Turn right onto the lake Alice Road and travel up the steep curvy road for 2.2 miles to the top of the hill. The road forks, keep to the left on Alice Lake Road for .5 miles to the WDFW on the right.

  • Ames Lake

  • Angle Lake: (102 acres): location: off Hwy 99 just 12 miles from downtown Seattle, at south 194th Street. The lake holds rainbows, kokanee and spiny rays (perch, bass, and catfish). There is a county park with boat launching available.

  • Annette LakeLake Annette (Take I-90 to exit 47 first stop sign turn right second turn left. Park your car and hike  4 miles). This is a 7 1/4 mile round trip hike, elevation gain 1400 feet.

  • Angeline Lake

  • Bass Lake (24 acres): This lake has a maximun depth of 40 feet. It contains, Largemouth Bass, yellow perch,Black Crappie and Sunfish. There's lots of parking and a gravel boat launch that is besst used to carry in boats. To get there from Black Diamond, Travel south on highway 169  4 miles to the WDFW access on right.

  • Beaver Lakes (11.6, 62.5, and 5.9 acres): This group of three connected lakes is location: two miles east of Pine Lake in Issaquah. The largest of the three has a public access with ramp and toilets located in the southeast corner. Largemouth bass and rainbow are the principal attraction, although yellow perch are also present. Year-around season.

  • Bear Lake

  • Bitter Lake (19 acres): location: off Highway 99 at 130th has shore fishing from a city park on the east end, but no developed boat ramp. Car toppers may be launched from the north and east sides. fish species: pumpkinseed sunfish, largemouth bass and brown bullhead catfish. Year-round open season.

  • Black Lake (26 acres): location: 9-1/2 miles northeast of Snoqualmie, fish species: rainbow trout. Expect good-to-excellent fishing for yearling fish 8 to10 inches, with carry-overs to 16 inches or larger. Access is by a one-way (easterly), dead-end spur along the lake's southern shore off Weyerhaeuser's mainline haul road. Float tubes or small car-toppers can be launched near the lake's northwest corner off the road embankment. Vehicular access to the Snoqualmie tree farm requires purchase of an annual access permit (Black Lake will be accessible year-round). Call 1-800-433-3911 for an access permit. Open fishing season is year-round.

  • Black Diamond Lake

  • Boren Lake (15 acres): location: four miles north of Renton, Boren has a public ramp on the northeast corner, but it lacks toilets and has little parking. There is a beautiful new public park on the lake's southeast corner, with ample facilities and a fishing dock. fish species: largemouth bass, yellow perch and brown bullhead, and Open all year long.

  • Boyle Lake (24 acres): location: on Weyerhaeuser property four miles northeast of Snoqualmie, and requires a short hike from nearby logging spurs. The middle of three interconnected lakes, it is managed primarily for native cutthroat. Largemouth bass and yellow perch are also present. The inlet and outlet are closed to fishing. Vehicular access to Snoqualmie Tree Farm requires purchase of an annual access permit (call 1-800-433-3911).

  • Brewster Lake

  • Bridges Lake (34 acres): On Weyerhaeuser property four miles northeast of Snoqualmie, Bridges is the uppermost of three interconnected lakes. A short hike from nearby logging spurs, it is managed mainly for native cutthroat trout. Largemouth bass and yellow perch are also present. The inlet and outlet are closed to fishing. Vehicular access to Snoqualmie Tree Farm requires purchase of an annual access permit (call 1-800-433-3911).

  • Burien Lake

  • Calligan Lake (310 acres):  8-1/2 miles northeast of North Bend, Calligan has a single rough access for car-toppers or light trailers midway down its north shore, plus scattered shoreline access. Calligan is accessed from several routes on Weyerhaeuser's Snoqualmie Tree Farm. Vehicular access to the tree farm requires purchase of an annual access permit (1-800-433-3911). Late season closures may be in effect due to fire danger. Calligan offers an unusual variety of sizable rainbow, cutthroat and eastern brook trout, all of which are wild. Best fishing is by canoe or float tube trolling wet fly or nymph patterns in the evenings. All tributary streams and the upper third of the outlet are closed to fishing. The season runs from June 1 through October 31.

  • Caroline Lake

  • Cherry Lake (3 acres): An angler's trail wends through the woods from a logging road to this small eastern brook trout lake location:  seven miles northeast of Duvall. Fishing is fair-to-good for 7- to 10-inch fish, all naturally produced. Best fished from a raft or float tube, as the shoreline is brushy. Open season is year-round

  • Cleveland Lake

  • Charlie Lake

  • Chetwood Lake

  • Cottage Lake (63 acres): location: on the Woodinville-Duvall Road three miles east of downtown Woodinville. Access is through the county park on the north shore, along the highway. A ramp is planned, but only bank and car-topper access is available now. Cottage's high productivity yields fat 10-12 inch rainbow trout from a spring fry plant. It also provides better-than-average opportunity for fat yellow perch, largemouth bass, black crappie, and brown bullheads. Open season is from the last Saturday in April through October 31.

  • Cougar Lake

  • Crater Lake

  • Crawford Lake

  • Deep Lake (39 acres): location: 4 1/2 miles south of State Hwy 169 turn east on SE 400th St. for two miles to Enumclaw/Kanasket Rd, then NE  a mile to Deep Lake entry road. The lake has a county park. There is rainbow, cutthroat, and spiny rays including bass. The lake has a public fishing pier (small), a little beach area, and a nice hiking trail around the lake. The boat launch is carry in only with limited parking. This would be an excellent lake to float tube on.

  • Derry Lake

  • Desire Lake (72 acres): location: southeast of Renton. There is access off of Petrovitsky Rd. approx. 6-7 miles east of Renton. The Lake Desire exit goes off to the north for  a mile. There is one boat launch at the north end of the lake which includes parking, toilets and a decent dock. Desire gets moderate use and is  half developed with best access by boat. Fish include rainbow trout, yellow perch, pumpkinseed sunfish and largemouth bass. There is a slot limit on bass. Lake Desire is open to fishing year-around.

  • Dolloff Lake (21 acres): This lake reaches depths of  19 feet. It holds largemouth Bass, Black Crappie, Yellow Perch, rock Bass, pumpkin seed sunfish, brown bullhead catfish and rainbows. It has a nice concrete boat launch, pit tiolets, and lots of parking space. To get there from Seattle, travel south on I-5 to the South 272nd St. exit, (Exit #147) Turn left (east) on S. 272nd St. for .2 mile to Military Road. Turn right (south) on Military Road for 2.4 miles. Just as you pass under the I-5 Freeway over pass, turn left on 31st Ave. S. (Sign will point to Lake Dolloff Elem. School) Follow 31st Ave S. for .3 mile to "Y" in the road. Keep right at the "Y" onto 38th Ave. So. Follow 38th Ave. So. for .6 mile to WDFW public access on the right.

  • Dorothy Lake: This is a large Alpine Lake of 290 acres at 3052 feet. It holds rainbows. Its  8 miles from Skykomish and takes  2 miles to hike into. The hike is  600 feet in elevation gain, a bit hard in some spots but not too bad. Towering granite cliffs with numerous elevated views make this a treat to hike to.

  • Dream Lake

  • Drunken Charlie Lake (3 acres): This small lake  nine miles east-northeast of Duvall is a bit of a challenge to find on a maze of logging roads, some of which may be gated. The sylvan setting and sphagnum shoreline are a pleasant relief from the more urbanized lakes in the area. This is an excellent ride by mountain-bike, but is best fished from a raft or float tube. Rainbow trout range from 8 inches to several pounds. A fickle lake that is challenging to fish effectively, it is stocked regularly with fry, and is open to fishing year-round.

  • Echo Lake (12 acres): location: 6 miles north of Seattle off Highway 99, Echo has access for car-toppers and some shore fishing through a small city park on the northeast corner of the lake. Echo's main attraction is rainbow trout, with yellow perch also present. Toilets and some picnic tables are available in the park, but parking is at a premium in the spring. Year-around season. 

  • Echo Lake

  • Edds Lake

  • Fenwick Lake (18 acres): location: two miles SW of Kent, Fenwick has a WDFW boat ramp on the west shore with bank access through Lake Fenwick Park. fish species: rainbow, largemouth bass, brown bullhead catfish, and yellow perch. Fishing season is year-around in this lake.

  • Five mile Lake (38 acres): location: 4 miles southwest of Auburn, with dock and bank access only through a county park, fish species: rainbow and largemouth bass. Year-around season.

  • Geneva Lake (28 acres): This small lake 2-1/2 miles southwest of Auburn off SR18 has a WDFW boat ramp on the northwest shore. Bank access, including a fishing pier, is through the county park on the northeast shore. Most of the action is for rainbow trout, although largemouth bass are also present. This lake has also been selected to receive a bonus plant of large triploid rainbow trout (averaging 1-1/2 pounds apiece). These sterile fish can grow to trophy size if not harvested. Last Saturday in April through October 31 open season.

  • Green Lake (255 acres): In the heart of Seattle near the intersection of Highway 99 and 60th North, Green Lake offers rainbow and brown trout, largemouth bass, yellow perch and brown bullhead catfish. Channel catfish are stocked in some years for diversity. Common carp and goldfish can be abundant. Boats can be rented at the northeast corner or car-toppers can be carried to the lake. Several fishing piers are placed around the lake. Green Lake is open to fishing year-around, and is typically stocked several times between mid-March and mid-June with a seasonal total of  13,000 catchable-size rainbow trout. Milfoil is a nuisance, and can interfere with fishing from April through October.

  • Grotto Lake

  • Haller Lake (15 acres): location: in North Seattle at Meridian Avenue North and 125th North, Haller has no developed access, but the lake may be reached for limited shore fishing and car-toppers from Meridian on the north shore and North 125th Avenue at the west end of the lake. This year-around lake offers rainbow trout, largemouth bass and perch.

  • Hancock Lake (236 acres): it's eight miles northeast of North Bend, Hancock has a single small dirt access for car-toppers or light trailers at its northwest corner. Shoreline access is available, but is generally poor. The lake is accessible from several routes on Weyerhaeuser's Snoqualmie Tree Farm. Vehicular access requires purchase of an annual access permit (call 1-800-433-3911). Late season closures may be in effect due to fire danger. Like nearby Calligan Lake, Hancock offers an unusual assortment of rainbow, cutthroat and eastern brook trout, all of wild origin. All tributary streams and the upper third of the outlet are closed to fishing. The season runs from June 1 through October 31.

  • Heart Lakes

  • Hester Lakes

  • Hidden Lake

  • Holm Lake (19 acres): Also called Nielsen or Neilsen Lake, Holm is midway between Auburn and Black Diamond, and is open to year-round fishing. A small WDFW access area with boat ramp, limited parking, and pit toilet is located at the lake's south end off SE Lake Holm Road. fish species: Largemouth bass and rainbow trout.

  • Holoman Lake

  • Hull Lake (6 acres): Hull is a large beaver-pond type lake nestled within Weyerhaeuser's Snoqualmie tree farm, nine miles north of Snoqualmie in the East Fork Griffin Creek drainage. It is managed for stocked cutthroat in a quiet forest setting, and is open year-round. Hull is fishable from shore, but best from a float tube or raft. Vehicular access to the tree farm requires purchase of an annual access permit call 1-800-433-3911.

  • Island Lake

  • Jones Lake

  • Joy Lake

  • Juanita Lake

  • Kathleen Lake

  • Kerrs Lake

  • Killarney Lake (31 acres): location:  3 miles southwest of Auburn just south of SR 18, Killarney has a narrow WDFW boat ramp on the northeast corner (across from access to Geneva Lake). The north end of the lake becomes shallow in the summer and fall, and boat launching becomes difficult; a shallow isthmus separates the main lake from the access bay. This year-around lake offers rainbow trout, largemouth bass, yellow perch, pumpkinseed sunfish and brown bullheads.

  • Kings Lake

  • Klaus Lake (62 acres): location: on Weyerhaeuser property four miles northeast of Snoqualmie, Klaus is the lowermost of three interconnected lakes (with Boyle and Bridges). There is a rough 4x4 car-topper access on the lake's southeast corner. Klaus is managed primarily for native cutthroat trout, with largemouth bass and yellow perch also present. Expect fair-to-good fishing for cutthroat up to 16 inches. The inlet and outlet are closed to fishing. Vehicular access to the Snoqualmie Tree Farm requires purchase of an annual access permit call 1-800-433-3911

  • Kulla Kulla Lake

  • Olallie Lake

  • Langendorfer Lake (5 acres): Also known as Stossel Lake, this and one or two adjacent ponds lie in the headwaters of Stossel Creek,  six miles northeast of Stillwater. Look for chunky coastal cutthroat of both wild and stocked origin. This small, low-elevation (580 feet) lake is best fished early in the season from a float tube or raft. It is accessible from an adjacent logging road, and is open to fishing year-round.

  • Langlois Lake (40 acres):  1 mile southeast of Carnation, Langlois has a well-developed WDFW access at its east end, with a ramp, parking and toilets. It is managed for rainbow trout. Expect good fly fishing for large holdover rainbows on summer evenings. Disabled-accessible facilities with paved surface are available. 

  • Larsen Lake (7 acres): Footpath access is available through Bellevue Park to this peat bog lake which has one public fishing pier/float and is ideal for float tubes. fish species: ative cutthroat, yellow perch, largemouth bass and brown bullheads. Open season is year-round.

  • Leota Lake

  • Lodge Lake

  • Loop Lake (36 acres): location:  three miles east of Carnation on Weyerhaeuser's Snoqualmie tree farm, beneath power lines. Vehicular access requires purchase of an annual access permit (call 1-800-433-3911). Motorized access is off the company's main gate near Snoqualmie, or the nearby Griffin Creek gate. Loop is an excellent choice for challenging float tube fishing for large eastern brook trout. The lake may summerkill in drought years, with diminished trout availability for a few years afterward. Open all year long for fishing.

  • Lucerne-Pipe Lakes

  • Lynch Lake (23 acres):  On Weyerhaeuser's Snoqualmie Tree Farm, a short distance north of the Tolt Pipeline Road via a logging spur, Lynch is 13 miles northeast of Snoqualmie, or 12 miles east of Duvall. Vehicular access requires purchase of an annual access permit (call 1-800-433-3911). Lynch Lake contains wild cutthroat trout, and is open all year for to fishing.

  • Malachite Lake

  • Maloney Lakes

  • Margaret Lake (40+ acres): location:   4 miles northeast of Duvall. There is large public access with ramp, parking and toilets at the southwest corner. It is managed for rainbow and cutthroat trout, but largemouth bass inhibit trout growth. 

  • Marie Lake

  • Marmot Lake

  • Marten Lake

  • Mason Lake

  • Maud Lake (2 acres): Maud is sandwiched between the North Fork Snoqualmie River and Weyerhaeuser's Spur 10 logging road,  eight miles north of North Bend. A moderate bushwhack is required to reach the very good fishing for stocked coastal cutthroat, which grow to 14 inches. A float tube or small raft is essential. The lake is open to fishing year-round.

  • McDonald Lake

  • McLeod Lake (13 acres): Five miles north of North Bend off the county road along the North Fork Snoqualmie River, McLeod offers high-quality rainbow and eastern brook trout fishing. Anglers must walk in  five minutes from the county road. A float tube or raft is needed since shoreline access is brushy or poor. There are no toilets, and fires, shooting, littering or camping are not allowed on Weyerhaeuser property. Year-around season.

  • Melakwa Lakes

  • Metcalf Lake (6 acres): This small beaver-pond type lake 3.5 miles northeast of Snoqualmie near Weyerhaeuser's mainline haul road has foot or car-topper access for stocked cutthroat trout. The season is open year-round, but the lake may dry up in extreme drought years. Vehicular access requires purchase of an annual access permit 1-800-433-3911.

  • Meridian Lake (147 acres): Between Kent and SR 18,  two miles east of Kent, this year-around lake has dual WDFW and county park access on the southeast shore with a boat ramp. An excellent fishing pier is available through the county park. Stocked with catchable-size rainbows after May 1 (to reduce bird predation), Meridian is also productive for largemouth bass, yellow perch and brown bullheads. Open all year.

  • Mine Pond

  • Moneysmith Lake

  • Moolock Lake

  • Nadeau Lake

  • Morton Lake (69 acres): location: four miles west of Black Diamond has a WDFW boat ramp on the northwest shore, with parking and toilets available. Catchable-size rainbow trout stocked shortly after May 1 are the main draw, but largemouth bass are also present.

  • Moss Lake (7 acres): 

  • Moss Lake (6.5 acres): Three miles north of Carnation off the Kelly/Stillwater Road. There is a primitive, undeveloped access from the south shore for float tubes, car-toppers and shore anglers. Wild cutthroat predominate, and Open all year long.

  • Mud Lake (14 acres)

  • Murphy Lakes

  • Nordrum Lake

  • North Lake (62 acres): Three miles west of Auburn just north of SR 18, North Lake has a large developed access area with ramp, toilets, a small fishing pier and boat trailer parking. North should be good for rainbow and cutthroat trout up to several pounds. Largemouth bass are also present. 

  • Paradise Lake

  • Peterson Lake (6.5 acres): This small lake two miles northwest of Maple Valley off the Petrovitsky Road has no developed access. Look for several angler "tunnels" through the brush down to the lake, which is best fished from a raft or float tube. Fry-planted cutthroat and rainbow trout are the main draw, with a year-round open season.

  • Phantom Lake (63 acres): 3-1/2 miles southeast of Bellevue, Phantom Lake has public access on the west side. A boat launch permit must be obtained through Bellevue City Park Department. A small float exists for shore fishing. Phantom offers largemouth bass and black crappie fishing, as well as yellow perch and brown bullhead catfish, with a slot limit on bass. Year-round open season.

  • Phillpa Lake

  • Pine Lake (103 acres): Exit 17 off I-90 at Issaquah, E. Sammamish rd to Issaquah/Pine Lake rd 2 1/2 miles. This lake holds rainbow, bass, sunfish, and crappie. It is 40 feet deep at the center and warms up quickly in the spring. The lake is developed and has an excellent county park on it. There is a large fishing pier and lot's parking. The boat launch is poor. It is gravel, small and uneven.

  • Preston mill Ponds

  • Rassmusen Lake 

  • Rattlesnake Lake (65 acres): location: close to Cedar Falls, south of North Bend (I-90 exit to 436th SE). Highly variable springs cause this unusual lake to fluctuate greatly in volume and surface area through the summer months. A park on the east shore has pit toilets and a primitive boat ramp. The lake is managed for rainbow trout, with fish to 15 inches taken. Selective fishery regulations are in effect, except electric motors are allowed. 

  • Ravensdale Lake (20 acres): A small lake that holds rainbow and cutthroat. A road from Black Diamond leads north 2 miles to east side of the lake.

  • Retreat Lake

  • Rock Lake

  • Round Lake

  • Sammamish Lake (5020 acres): Developed shoreline. Reached off I-90 west of Issaquah. Take exit 15 north 1/4 mile to SE 56th street then east 1/2 mile to a left turn to the State Park launch area (fee). This is the only launch on the entire lake and has 8+ lanes. It needs it due to the heavy use by recreational boaters of all types.
    This lake holds a variety of fish including bass, perch, trout, and sea -run cutthroat, as well as Chinook and Sockeye Salmon passing through to spawn. Check regs carefully for seasons. Lake Sammamish is well known for its bass fishing. The lake gets heavy use from water skiers and jet boats so it is not a lake to go to for peace and solitude. The state park is an excellent day-use facility. Very crowded in the summer months. 

  • Sawyer Lake (315 acres): location: two miles northwest of Black Diamond has a boat ramp and bank access available through Lake Sawyer County Park on the northwest shore. fish species: rainbow, cutthroat, kokanee, yellow perch, largemouth and smallmouth bass, brown bullhead catfish and pumpkinseed sunfish. Northern squawfish are also abundant in the lake, which hosts a salmon run too. The rainbow, bass and perch fisheries are above average on this year-around water.

  • Shadow Lake (53 acres): location:  2 miles west of Maple Valley with WDFW access on the north arm, fish species: rainbow, various sunfish, yellow perch and largemouth bass. Fishing season is open year-around.

  • Shady Lake (20 acres): location: 3-1/2 miles northwest of Maple Valley, Shady has a developed WDFW access on the south shore with parking, toilets and ramp. Catchable-size rainbow trout are stocked to supplement the lake's bass and sunfish populations. The season runs from June 1 to October 31, with only one trout over 14 inches allowed in the five-trout limit. Disabled accessibility - Level 3, DP, WCT, gs, steep to lake. 

  • Sikes Lake

  • Skyline Lake

  • Snoqualmie Lake

  • Snow Lake

  • Spring Lake (68 acres): Between Renton and Maple Valley. Has a county park and a small boat launch.Internal combustion engines are restricted. This is a year round lake with lots of Rainbows, largemouth Bass, yellow perch and brown bullheads.
    location: 5 miles SE of Renton on Hwy 169, south for 1.5 miles on 196th SE.

  • Star Lake (34 acres): This lake has a maximun depth of 50 feet. Holds Largemouth Bass, Yellow Perch,Rainbow, brown bullhead catfish. Has a gravel launch and not much room to move around. To get to Star Lake from Seattle from Seattle, travel south on I-5 to the 272nd exit. (Exit #47) Turn left (east) and travel 272nd St. for .2 mile to Military Road. Turn right on Military Road for .2 mile to S. Star Lake Road. Turn left onto Star Lake Road for .4 mile to the street end access at 37th Ave.

  • Steel Lake (46 acres): Maximum depth of 24 feet. fish species: largemouth bass, yellow perch, pumpkinseed sunfish, brown bullhead catfish and rainbow trout. Has paved parking a portable toilet, and a good concrete boat ramp. No internal combustion engines allowed on lake. To get to Steel Lake from Seattle, travel south on I-5 to the 272nd St. exit. (Exit # 147) Turn left (east) and follow 272nd Street .2 mile to Military Road. Turn right onto Military Road and travel south to S. 304th Street. Turn right onto 304th Street for only  .1 mile to stop sign at 28th Ave S. Turn left onto 28th Ave. S. for .4 mile to 312th Street. Turn right on 312th for only  .1 mile and enter. 

  • Sunday Lake (21 acres): This unusual lowland lake, just within the Alpine Lakes Wilderness in the north fork Snoqualmie River drainage  12 miles northeast of North Bend, produces relatively large cutthroat trout, particularly in mid- to late-summer for skilled fly anglers. The hike-in access requires fording of Sunday Creek. The lake may fluctuate widely in size in drought years, and is best fished from a raft. Expect slow fishing when the lake is swollen with snow-melt. Open all year long.

  • Surprise Lake

  • Surveyors Lake

  • Sylvia Lake (11 acres): Near the King/Snohomish county line,  7 miles southeast of Sultan. location: stocked with eastern brook fry, which attain large size and beautiful condition. Flesh quality is highest in the spring before the lake gets too warm. Best fished from a raft or float tube. The lake is open year-round, but its 2310-foot elevation may preclude access during colder months.

  • Swans Mill Ponds

  • T'ahl Lake

  • Talapus Lake

  • Terrace Lakes

  • Thompson Lake

  • Top Lake

  • Tradition Lake (22 acres): Beside  the Tiger Mountain trail system, this lake contains yellow perch and largemouth bass. A slot limit is in effect for bass. Year-round open season.

  • Trout Lake (18 acres): This lake has a maximum depth of 27 feet. fish species: large-mouth bass, yellow perch, crappie, bluegill, bullhead catfish and planted rainbow trout. Has no boat launch and very little room to move a rig with a trailer around. 

  • Twelve Lake (43 acres): 

  • location: 1-1/2 miles northeast of Black Diamond, Twelve Lake has a WDFW boat ramp on the south shore. 

  • Union Lake

  • Walker Lake (11 acres): location: 1-1/2 miles southeast of Cumberland has a narrow, steep WDFW boat ramp on the south shore. Parking is limited, as is shore fishing access. Pumpkinseed sunfish compete for food with stocked rainbow and cutthroat, so trout size and condition is diminished.

  • Washington Lake (22,138 acres): 

  • Sockeye salmon were introduced into Lake Washington in 1937. Salmon initially bred in the Cedar River, bigining in the late 1930's, but also began breeding along the lake beaches by 1957. Because of the two different environments, in 13 generations the salmon evolved into two genically different populations. Beach males have deeper bodies, with larger humps which are favored by females. Bach females are 10% smaller than river females. River males are streamlined with small humps, to swim easier in the river. River females are large and strong, to build deeper nests in fast moving water, which prtects the eggs during floods. fish species: trout.

  • Wildcat Lakes

  • Wilderness Lake (70+ acres): location:  2 miles south of Maple Valley, Wilderness has a WDFW boat ramp, and bank access available through the county park on the northwest shore. fish species: rainbow kokanee and largemouth bass.

  • Wittenmeyer Lake

  • Windy Lake

    Kitsap County

  • Bear Lake
  • Bainbridge Island Lake
  • Buck Lake
  • Fairview Lake
  • Flora Lake
  • Glud Ponds
  • Horseshoe Lake
  • Island Lake
  • Kitsap County Lake
  • Long Lake
  • Ludvick Lake
  • Panther Lake
  • Scout Lake
  • Square Lake
  • Three Finger Chain Beaver Ponds
  • Wildcat Lake

    Kittitas County
  • Alaska Lake
  • Baker Lake
  • Box Canyon Lake
  • Bullfrog Pond: The pond is small and only 6ft deep. You can't use a boat or float tube and have to bank fish only. The land is swampy around the pond. But the WDFW has stocked this pond.
  • Chikamin Lake
  • Cle Elum Lake: (4800 acres): Cle Elum is a high Cascade lake and hosts rainbow, cutthroat, kokanee, Dolly Varden, eastern brook, whitefish, and burbot. Even sais to have mackinaw to 20 pounds. Take I-90, 7.3 miles NE of Cle Elum on the Salmon La Sac road. The road runs along the lake at several different spots. Boats may be launched at Wishpoosh, and at Bell, Morgan, and Dry Creeks. location: 30 miles northwest of Ellensburg off Washington Hwy. 903.
  • Cooper Lake: (120 acres): This high lake above Salmon-La-Sac is a consistent producer of brook trout and rainbows 7 to 10 inches. Small kokanee are also taken. Cooper Lake is accessible by road from the upper Cle Elum River, and a boat-launching facility is available. Gasoline motors are prohibited. Open to fishing year-around.
  • Cottonwood Lakes: Two small lakes at 3900 feet, 1 1/2 and 8 acres. Hold rainbow, cuttthroat, and brookies. Take the Lost lake road from Stampede pass road, go one mile past Lost to Mirror lake trail. Shore and tube access only.
  • Deep Lake
  • Diamond Lake
  • Easton Lake: (237 acres): location: West of  Easton, this lake has fair fishing after late May for 8 to 10-inch planted rainbows. The lake is open to fishing year-around.
  • Easton Ponds: Former gravel pits that are stocked with brown and rainbow trout. On the east side of Easton, on the south side of the Yakima river.
  • Fio Rito Lake
  • Fiorito Lakes: location: just south of Ellensburg and you can see them if you are travelling on I-82 towards Yakima, they are on your left as well. They are stocked with Browns and Rainbows.
  • Fish Lake (63 acres): Fish This popular slough-like lake on the upper Cle Elum River has brook trout and a few rainbows. Open to fishing year-around. Check the regulations pamphlet for special trout rules.
  • Glacier Lake
  • Gold Lake
  • Hansen's Ponds
  • These small year-around lakes near  Cle Elum should be fair for 8- to 9-inch planted rainbows in the early season.
  • Hyas Lake
  • Kachess Lake: (4,540 acres): A very popular lake with good camping areas and good boat launching, Kachess should be fair for 8- to 9-inch kokanee by early June. Rainbows, cutthroat and burbot are also taken. The lake is closed to fishing for bull trout; please carefully release any bull trout that are hooked. Open to fishing year-around, Kachess is just north of I-90,  5 miles west of Cle Elum Lake.
  • Keechelus Lake: (2,500 acres) location: three miles east of Snoqualmie Pass taking the Coal Creek exit to the boat launch. There is also lots of shore fishing on the north side of the lake which I-90 parallels. The lake is at an elevation of over 3000 ft. so fishing doesn't warm up until a little later in the summer. Keechelus holds Kokanee, Rainbows, Dolley Varden and Bull Trout (both closed to fishing this year). There is also fresh water ling (Burbot) available. There is a nice concrete boat launch with good parking and at the same location a road which runs into the lake and could also be used to launch boats.
  • Kendall Peak Lakes
  • Laura and Lillian Lakes
  • Lavender Lake: Good fishing for rainbow and brown trout. Open year-around. 
  • Lemah Lake
  • Lost Lake: (145 acres): location:  a mile west of Keechelus Lake, this Lost Lake contains kokanee and brook trout. Although brookies average only 9 inches, there are some lunkers. Year-around season.
  • Lost Lake
  • Mattoon Lake: location: at Ellensburg, this lake offers good fishing for 8- to 14-inch rainbows. Good bank fishing opportunity for those who do not have boats. Numerous sunfish can be pests to trout anglers. Open season is year-around.
  • Michael Lake
  • Milk Lake
  • Mirrow Lake
  • Naneum Pond
  • Pete Lake
  • Park Lakes
  • Rachel Lake
  • Ridge Lake
  • Spade Lake
  • Squaw Lake
  • Stirrup Lake
  • Summit Chief Lake
  • Swan Lake
  • Taneum Lake
  • Three Queens Lake
  • Terrace Lake
  • Thorpe Lake
  • Tucquala Lake
  • Twin Lakes
  • Waptus Lake
  • Wood House Loop Ponds

Klickitat County

  • Chamberlain Lake
  • Horse Thief Lake (92 acres): fish species: rainbow trout, some species of warmwater fish. In Horsethief State Park near Lyle between the Columbia River and Highway 14.Be sure to check with the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission for park opening and closing dates.
  • Locke Lake
  • Northwestern Lake
  • Northwestern Reservoir (105 acres)
  • Pothole Lake
  • Rowland Lake (approx 85 acres): fish species: rainbow trout, eastern brook trout, some species of warmwater fish.
  • Spearfish Lake: fish species: rainbow trout, some species of warmwater fish.
  • Spearfish Lake (22 acres)
  • Trout Lake

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